Miriam Bean | About
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Sound // Noise

Working with sound as both a medium and a subject, Miriam primarily uses noise in conjunction with dissonance to create indeterminate installations. Her research into sound perception ranges from physiology to musicology, seeking to understand how the brain interprets some sounds as jarring noise and others as expressive, concordant music. The term ‘dissonance’ is not unique to music theory. In psychoacoustics, the science of how sound is received and interpreted by the brain, physicists have a number of neurological and acoustical explanations as to why certain sounds clash. By comparing cultural receptions of dissonance with physiological evidence, there is reason to suggest that the physicality of noise is integral to the psychological responses to dissonant works of art and music. Her main aim in making discordant works is to create something visceral, in which the listener has a strong reaction to. However, whether the inclination is positive or negative is less important than the response itself. When using indeterminate techniques, she is able to question her own response and listen to the outcome as an audience member, because the composition is left to chance. Through subtle spatial intervention, she creates live installations using an array of old and new technology to project sound waves into a space, and in most cases, keeps the timbre of the work as neutral as possible by using sine frequencies. Miriam’s installations create an experience for the public that shows the power of resonance by highlighting the unearthly nature of pure tones, and the effect they have on space and material.

UNIVERSITY OF LINCOLN — 2013 – 2016

Fine Art BA (Hons)

 

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS

2018  Gallery Without Walls 04

— LCB Depot, Leicester

2018  Loop

— LCB Depot, Leicester

2018  Four (Solo Exhibition)

— Phoenix, Leicester

2017  Leftovers

— Surface Gallery, Nottingham

2017  Love Leicester

— De Montfort University, Leicester

2016  EM16: Pulse (Residency)

— Surface Gallery, Nottingham

2016  Apex

University of Lincoln

2015  Lucky Like (Collaboration)

Frequency Festival, Lincoln

2015  Timequake

Vonnegut Arts Festival, Lincoln

2014  The Ecclesiastical Space

University of Lincoln

Sound // Noise

Working with sound as both a medium and a subject, Miriam primarily uses noise in conjunction with dissonance to create indeterminate installations. Her research into sound perception ranges from physiology to musicology, seeking to understand how the brain interprets some sounds as jarring noise and others as expressive, concordant music. The term ‘dissonance’ is not unique to music theory. In psychoacoustics, the science of how sound is received and interpreted by the brain, physicists have a number of neurological and acoustical explanations as to why certain sounds clash. By comparing cultural receptions of dissonance with physiological evidence, there is reason to suggest that the physicality of noise is integral to the psychological responses to dissonant works of art and music. Her main aim in making discordant works is to create something visceral, in which the listener has a strong reaction to. However, whether the inclination is positive or negative is less important than the response itself. When using indeterminate techniques, she is able to question her own response and listen to the outcome as an audience member, because the composition is left to chance. Through subtle spatial intervention, she creates live installations using an array of old and new technology to project sound waves into a space, and in most cases, keeps the timbre of the work as neutral as possible by using sine frequencies. Miriam’s installations create an experience for the public that shows the power of resonance by highlighting the unearthly nature of pure tones, and the effect they have on space and material.

UNIVERSITY OF LINCOLN — 2013 – 2016

Fine Art BA (Hons)

 

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS

2018  Gallery Without Walls 04

— LCB Depot, Leicester

2018  Loop

— LCB Depot, Leicester

2018  Four (Solo Exhibition)

— Phoenix, Leicester

2017  Leftovers

— Surface Gallery, Nottingham

2017  Love Leicester

— De Montfort University, Leicester

2016  EM16: Pulse (Residency)

— Surface Gallery, Nottingham

2016  Apex

University of Lincoln

2015  Lucky Like (Collaboration)

Frequency Festival, Lincoln

2015  Timequake

Vonnegut Arts Festival, Lincoln

2014  The Ecclesiastical Space

University of Lincoln